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Video Production Copyright Curriculum

VIDEO COPYRIGHT ISSUES

 

 

How to protect your video content from freebooting on Facebook.
Freebooting (also known as video piracy) is the act of downloading someone else’s copyrighted video (usually from YouTube) and uploading it to Facebook as your own. You need to protect your content and make sure you don’t unknowingly propagate the work of pirates. freebooting “is not the same as sharing or linking or embedding [online media] from its original source. Freebooting means downloading it without permission from the creator or copyright holder and redistributing it for your own use, often for your own monetary gain. 72.5% of the videos on Facebook are pirated. “According to report from Ogilvy and Tubular Labs if you’re monetizing your YouTube channel, you’ll miss out on ad revenues if someone is scraping and reusing your videos.
#1 File a Complaint
#2: Report Freebooted Videos
Go to the top right of any Facebook post on desktop, then click the gray down-pointing arrow. Then choose I Don’t Like This Post from the drop-down menu. Select the I Think It Shouldn’t Be on Facebook option. You’ll then be able to state the issue, and whether it’s your content or someone else’s.
Directly report infringements of your copyright on Facebook here.
#3 Put a watermark or your logo on the lower third throughout the video. That way if the video gets scraped, people will still know it’s from you.

 

Download Videos using screen recording software.
Free Programs like Ezvid and Screenr allow you to record what is happening on-screen and save the recording as a video file. Hint: watch the video in full-screen while you record. Screenr works entirely in your browser, allowing you to record videos without the need to set up a program installation.

 

Youtube tricks

Adding Watermark Or Branding Logo
YouTube allows the addition of a logo of watermark of a brand for your channel, company or organization in your YouTube videos. Sign in to your YouTube account and click on the Creator Studio button.
Click on CHANNEL > Branding > Add a watermark > Choose File Button > Save > Update.
Then, you can define the Display time for the watermark or logo to be displayed on your video. You need to only do this once and the watermark will appear in all of your uploaded videos.

http://gifyoutube.com/
http://gifyoutube.com/gif/vqqZn2

ECP NCFR

Steal This Disc 2006

 

July 7, 2008 Copyright and remix culture, Recut, Reframe, Recycle: Quoting Copyrighted Material in User-Generated Video.

Best practices will allow users to make remixes, mashups, and other common online genres with the knowledge that they are staying within copyright law. The code identifies, among other things, six kinds of unlicensed uses of copyrighted material that may be considered fair, under certain limitations PDF. They are:

For instance, a blogger's critique of mainstream news is commentary. The toddler dancing to the song "Let s Go Crazy" is an example of incidental capture of copyrighted material. Many variations on the popular online video "Dramatic Chipmunk" may be considered fair use, because they recombine existing work to create new meaning. If you would like to receive more information about the code, please contact 202-274-4442 read PDF

Getting out of the restrictive DRM scheme with MIRO

 

It is Illegal: TV Torrents: Practical Tips When 'piracy' is easier than legal purchase 2007
http://www.cnet.com/8301-13739_1-9775271-46.html
http://www.getmiro.com/ then locate an RSS feed like uTorrent, BitTorrent, ShareTV.org or http://www.tvrss.net/shows/ to find a TV show you want to watch. On the web-page for the show, right click on the link to the RSS feed of that show, and copy the URL location. Open up Miro, and go to the Channels menu, and select Add Channel. The RSS address that was copied previously should already be displayed. If it's not, paste it.Miro should now automatically download the latest episode of that show, which it will continue to do every time a new episode appears online. For ease of use, a user will probably want to rename the channel to something recognizable. This can be done by going to the Channels menu and selecting Rename. also see http://tvfreedom.wordpress.com/

YOU TUBE - BROADCAST YOURSELF.

NMPA/HFA/YOUTUBE LICENSING OFFER SUMMARY

If youtube has pulled the video because of copyright violations it is going to turn up on DailyMotion.com located in Paris, where entire TV shows, even series, can be viewed.

Video Content Creators Should Watch Watermarking Test

CopyRight Issues: Use of early recordings for documentary video

Those of you who work with documentary films may be interested in the Documentary Organization of Canada's recent white paper on the chilling effects of the current copyright-clearance culture.  Canada has helped with the production of numerous films over the years via the taxpayer-funded National Film Board.  Now, many great 
documentaries funded through this program have become unavailable due to the expense and potential litigation involved in re-licensing copyrighted elements.  See the full document in .pdf form at: http://tinyurl.com/y8b8j9

Folklore Protection and National Patrimony:
Developments and Dilemmas in the Legal Protection of Folklore PDF- By Alan Jabbour

Douglas Day, M.A., Ph.D <http://www.southernfolklorists.org> asked:
The videographer would like to use excerpts from historic recordings as background or incidental music. While these selections are old spirituals, they are of course of the highly arranged variety. Is it copyrighted? If so, what's the most painless way of getting permission? From whom? What about the advisability of recording local choirs doing public domain material?

David A. Brose Folklorist <http://www.folkschool.org> replies:
[ The first "official" publication I ever did in my life was a 33 1/3" vinyl disc called "Folk Music of Ohio - 1938" that issued (for the first time) field recordings that Alan and Elizabeth Lomax had made in Cincinnati, Ohio in March, 1938. This was an undergraduate student project that myself and a couple of other undergrad's worked on as an "honors" type project. We put out 1,000 records. We were faced with the same kind of situation as y'all on your project, as these were old recordings and the performers were all, in every case, long dead. Any other record, CD, film project or radio program that I have been involved in since has dealt with my own field recordings of still living folks, so it was as simple when "publication" time came as striking a deal with the performers as to what kind of money they wanted, and then (if copyrighted) working through the Harry Fox agency in New York to pay the electronic licensing fees for the songs so that ASCAP, SESAC YOUTUBE, and/or BMI would be happy. With the 1938 Lomax field- collected material (which we obtained from what was then the Archive of Folksong at the LOC) we were instructed by Joe Hickerson to simply write a letter to each singer or musician that was on the recording (though we knew them to be dead); send the letter return receipt registered mail, and keep a copy of the letter, unopened, when it came back to us, as proof that we had tried to "be good guys" and pay the families or next of kin for the performers. This album came out in 1976. The performers were recorded in 1938. As we did not always have adresses for next of kin, we sent certain of the letters simply to "general delivery-Cincinnati, Ohio." One band was called "The Ft. Thomas (KY) Stringband." We sent their letter care of general delivery, Ft. Thomas, Kentucky  ........ you get the idea ........  although you know from the start that these folks are dead, you just do the best you can via mail to attempt to find next of kin and save the unopened letter as proof that you did your best . . . ]
"This might demonstrate that you've exercised best efforts in reaching a copyright holder. While this doesn't qualify as permission, it does seem to be reasonable. An attorney recommended to me that if this course was taken, that royalties for the family or relative of the recording artist be held in account for a period of 7 years." Source

Folklore Protection and National Patrimony:
Developments and Dilemmas in the Legal Protection of Folklore PDF- By Alan Jabbour

Douglas Day, M.A., Ph.D <http://www.southernfolklorists.org> asked:
The videographer would like to use excerpts from historic recordings as background or incidental music. While these selections are old spirituals, they are of course of the highly arranged variety. Is it copyrighted? If so, what's the most painless way of getting permission? From whom? What about the advisability of recording local choirs doing public domain material?

David A. Brose Folklorist <http://www.folkschool.org> replies:
[ The first "official" publication I ever did in my life was a 33 1/3" vinyl disc called "Folk Music of Ohio - 1938" that issued (for the first time) field recordings that Alan and Elizabeth Lomax had made in Cincinnati, Ohio in March, 1938. This was an undergraduate student project that myself and a couple of other undergrad's worked on as an "honors" type project. We put out 1,000 records. We were faced with the same kind of situation as y'all on your project, as these were old recordings and the performers were all, in every case, long dead. Any other record, CD, film project or radio program that I have been involved in since has dealt with my own field recordings of still living folks, so it was as simple when "publication" time came as striking a deal with the performers as to what kind of money they wanted, and then (if copyrighted) working through the Harry Fox agency in New York to pay the electronic licensing fees for the songs so that ASCAP, SESAC and/or BMI would be happy. With the 1938 Lomax field- collected material (which we obtained from what was then the Archive of Folksong at the LOC) we were instructed by Joe Hickerson to simply write a letter to each singer or musician that was on the recording (though we knew them to be dead); send the letter return receipt registered mail, and keep a copy of the letter, unopened, when it came back to us, as proof that we had tried to "be good guys" and pay the families or next of kin for the performers. This album came out in 1976. The performers were recorded in 1938. As we did not always have adresses for next of kin, we sent certain of the letters simply to "general delivery-Cincinnati, Ohio." One band was called "The Ft. Thomas (KY) Stringband." We sent their letter care of general delivery, Ft. Thomas, Kentucky  ........ you get the idea ........  although you know from the start that these folks are dead, you just do the best you can via mail to attempt to find next of kin and save the unopened letter as proof that you did your best . . . ]
"This might demonstrate that you've exercised best efforts in reaching a copyright holder. While this doesn't qualify as permission, it does seem to be reasonable. An attorney recommended to me that if this course was taken, that royalties for the family or relative of the recording artist be held in account for a period of 7 years." Source

 

ROYALTY FREE VIDEO ONLINE

Royalty Free Video Clips for Classroom Use Internet Archive has a lot of public domain clips. Movies

http://www.archive.org/about/faqs.php#Movies

How does a filmmaker document the world around her when the sights and sounds that make up that world are copyright protected? Law professors Keith Aoki, James Boyle and Jennifer Jenkins co-wrote and produced the comic book Bound By Law? Tales From the Public Domain. It explores the legal barriers documentary filmmakers in particular must hurdle, or simply avoid. See the Free Digital Version now. A documentary is being filmed. A cell phone rings, playing the “Rocky” theme song. The filmmaker is told she must pay $10,000 to clear the rights to the song. Can this be true? “Eyes on the Prize,” the great civil rights documentary, was pulled from circulation because the filmmakers' rights to music and footage had expired. What's going on here? It's the collision of documentary filmmaking and intellectual property law, and it's the inspiration for this new comic book. Follow its heroine Akiko as she films her documentary, and navigates the twists and turns of intellectual property. Why do we have copyrights? What's “fair use”? Bound By Law reaches beyond documentary film to provide a commentary on the most pressing issues facing law, art, property and an increasingly digital world of remixed culture.

VIDEO RESOURCES

 

 

http://www.edheads.org/   They are interactive games, but could be considered “video”. 

http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks2bitesize/ Elementary level reading, math, and science.  BBC will be the owner and producer. There are interactive games on here, but also some videos. 

http://www.accreditedonlinecolleges.com/blog/2010/100-informative-inspiring-youtube-videos-for-educators/ Blog: 100 Informative and Inspiring Youtube Videos for Educators.

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/student-activities I’ve already loaded the Study Jam videos from this website, but it looks like there’s tons more stuff to dig through.  Don’t know how much of it has already been tackled.

http://www.scholastic.com/kids/stacks/?lnkid=stacks/nav/home/main  These videos are all dealing with children’s literature and authors.

http://classroomclips.org/video Lots of videos on various subjects. History, Art, Science, Math, Computer Tech.  Good for upper grades too. 

http://greenenergytv.com/category.php All science videos.  Some appear to be more of an ad than educational. 

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/video/index.html All upper level biology videos. 

http://www.science.tv/videos.html Videos are actually from Youtube. 

http://learning.snagfilms.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/collections We’ve loaded from BBC in the past, but if there are any new videos that have been added to their site, we need to continue to add them to ours. We need to go back and add the newer releases.

http://www.nfb.ca/education/  (main link, or see 3 additional links below)

http://www.youtube.com/user/alananachmani/videos  These are teacher-made videos on various topics, in lecture format. 

http://www.tpt.org/newtons/ Newton’s Apple, science links.

http://www.cookie.com/kids/video/viewallvideos.html  Preschool videos.    For example: Multiplication – Interactive Game.

http://www.cnn.com/studentnews/ These are daily news clips for current headlines that are kid friendly.  Owner and producer would be CNN.

http://dotsub.com/ Some neat videos that include subtitles and options in various other languages. 

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/videoLibrary/  If you're interested in showing your students the inner workings of Congressional proceedings, visit the C-Span video library.  161,676 videos total on this site.  Might be better to search by category and work your way through from top to bottom.  With so many videos, may want to be selective to only load the highest quality, most relevant for students. There is also an entire section for “campaign 2012” videos. 

http://www.untamedscience.com/podcast Untamed Science is a collection of videos and podcasts about biology and Earth science topics. Untamed Science will be the owner and producer.  Times and descriptions are also already provided on the site.

http://fora.tv/ Topics include business, environment, politics, science, technology, and culture.  FORA.tv is similar to Big Think in that it presents videos relevant to topics in the news and in the public conscious today. The videos feature well known personalities and experts talking about the important issues of the day. You will also videos of debates, press conferences, and public meetings.

http://historybuff.com/panos/index.html History Buff includes a set of fifteen narrated panoramic tours of interesting and significant historic sites. Some of the panoramas you will find in the collection include Davy Crockett's childhood home, Appomattox Courthouse, Thomas Edison's birthplace, and Valley Forge. Please add “allow time for panoramas to load” in the descriptions. History Buff is owner and producer.

http://www.seeflik.com/ See Flik is a new website featuring the works of undergraduate and graduate film production students. The purpose of the site is to bring exposure to these new filmmakers. The short films on See Flik are arranged according to genre, length of film, and total views. Applications for Education: To warn you, some of the films are a little "out there" and a few deal with topics that probably aren't appropriate for most high school settings. That said, See Flik still has some potential for classroom use particularly if you're interested in having your students critique elements of film creation. Review and select videos carefully. 

http://havefunwithhistory.com/movies/index.html

http://www.math-videos-online.com/index.html These are math videos listed by various subjects. I believe the owner and producer will also be Math Videos Online. 

http://www.glencoe.com/sites/ss_modules/videos/tajmt_09/TAJMT_09.html  These are video introductions to each chapter in the McGraw-Hill social studies textbook.  Descriptions are not provided.  Glencoe will be the owner and producer of each.

http://www.woopid.com/channels.php These are free, technology training videos.  Some appear to be outdated (AIM) and some may not be usable for school.  Be selective with what you choose to embed.  Place them in the “Computers/Technology” folder.  Subfolders may need to be created.  Please feel free to contact me with questions about creating new subfolders.

http://vimeo.com/hybridmedical/videos   There are some beautiful, digital animations. 

http://www.dnatube.com/video/12154/Copper-video--Periodic-Table-of-Videos There appear to be more than 9,000 videos on this site.  However, I do find the ones about the elements in the periodic table to be useful. 

http://www.dolectures.com/lectures/?view=all  102 videos of “inspiring talks from people who are changing the world.”  Older viewing audience.  Some may be too advanced for HS level. Various topics. Business, creativity, environment, food, sports, technology, and well-being. Some are longer in length but if quality is exceptional, still load.

http://documentaryheaven.com/?orderby=title&order=asc  Over 2,000 documentaries.  Subjects vary but definitely for an older audience.  Not all will be appropriate for HS. Owners and producers will also vary.  Some are lengthy.

http://www.newsy.com/  “Multisource Video News” Current events.  Older audience. Short clips. Nice discussion starters at the HS level.

http://pbskids.org/games/index.html PBS Games.  Makes sure to add (Interactive Game) into the title and description.  Some games are in Spanish.

http://www.commonsensemedia.org/ videos for educators and parents.  Movie reviews.  Advice about internet safety, tv violence etc.  Common Sense will be owner and producer.

http://www.youtube.com/user/WorldVisionUSA/videos This looks like a great set of videos on hunger etc by World Vision USA. 

http://www.eduplace.com/science/hmsc/content/vocabgames/index.html  Houghton Mifflin (the science textbook) site includes a HUGE list of interactive games for grades 1-6.  As you click on a game, a new pop-up window with the actual game should appear. 

http://www.eduplace.com/kids/mw/ Houghton Mifflin (the textbook) also has a site that includes a HUGE list of interactive math games for grades k-6.   

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/games/ National Geographic for Kids has a few games on their site. 

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/kids/ National Geographic for Kids is adding GREAT new videos every day. 

http://www.teachersdomain.org/ Great site with a variety of topics and grade levels. 

BrainPOP Biology videos.

http://www.commoncraft.com/” Common Craft videos have helped teachers and trainers delight millions by making complex ideas easy to understand.”  Topics ranging from blogs, borrowing money, computing in the cloud, plagiarism, social media, twitter, and more. 

http://www.pearltrees.com/#/N-fa=3114380&N-u=1_335577&N-p=30135397&N-s=1_4133293&N-f=1_4133293 This web on PearlTrees appears to have MANY links to educational videos.  Worth checking into.

http://irosteveperry.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/52596233/FREE%20VIDEO%20SITES%202012.pdf Another list of links to check into.

 

 

Digital Rights Management

The Digital Video Information Network
My Voice, My Choice: Some Basic Copyright Caveats an article by Douglas Spotted Eagle

The Constitution of the United States Article I, Section 8, clause 8;
To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries;

Youtube Video Production Curriculum

 

Ripping legal video from DVD

 

 

Ripping legal video from DVD ~ Daniel Gross, Director Southeastern Wisconsin Instructional Network Group (SWING)

FYI: for approx. $20.00 Circuit City will rip your video for you.

I have some "home made" DVDs. I need to get some short excerpts from them for training purposes. You can not load up a DVD in Windows Movie Maker (or Adobe Premiere, or whatever) and trim a clip. This is what I needed to do.
Previously, I would have had to plug the s-video output of a DVD player into a media converter (I have a Sony DA2, no longer made, but another person suggested a similar product made by Canopus) and then import that
video over the firewire. (Or whatever analog to digital media converter you happen to have. Dazzle is another named possibility.) This involves a big loss of quality.
Another suggestion from someone was to play the DVD on my computer, and use "camtasia" or a screen grabbing program to re-record the video. This too is an unacceptable analog to digital conversion.
What I needed to do was to "rip" the digital files from the DVD, and re-encode them at a different resolution and bitrate (transcode) with a different compression. (AVI works well for the intermediate rip. Although it is large, it is minimally compressed and as such has minimal degradation when you transcode the final product. Ultimately, I wanted Windows Media files for use in PowerPoint.)
Several Mac users suggested that good programs exist for their platform (I don't have access to a Mac) including Handbrake. One user suggested a website that might have software like what I needed: www.dvdhelp.com.
In reality, I found the Handbrake homepage, then used Google's reverse lookup to see who linked to it, and looked for "how to" guides on doing what I needed to do with an emphasis on Windows, not Mac. After trying
several products I didn't like that wanted too much money (>$50), didn't work, or were just generally scary looking, I came across a solution that worked for me - CloneAD's CLAD DVD ripper: http://www.clonead.co.uk/
I needed the cladDVD.NET, avi.NET, AVISynth, and XviD downloads from their download pages.
The other programs would be needed if I needed to further modify, compress and re-encode the DVDs (i.e. COPY them) back to other media. I didn't install them, because that isn't my goal here.
Another poster suggested the DIVX codec. I chose XviD because it was free, although DIVX probably would offer me greater re-compression. (My clips are short, so it's not a big deal.) DIVX is not free. It is also just a codec - it doesn't perform the "whole" function of ripping and converting these files. It just does the final job.
OK. So, put the DVD in the drive, and run the CLADDVD.NET program. It is pretty self explanatory, but it basically copies the VOB files from the DVD to your hard drive. The documentation tells you to do this rather than manually drag and drop the VOB files, as they may not be "sequentially linear" on the DVD. (i.e. You may get various video segments out of order.) It is a reasonably quick process, but takes a lot of drive space.
I suggest you rename the file at this point. Since the same device made my VOB files, they all had the same name, and I got filename conflict errors unless I renamed or deleted the files when I started the second DVD.
Then, run the AVI.NET program. You will have to find the VOB file left from the previous program after you click the source button, and if you renamed them like I suggest, you probably found them at the root of your C:\ drive. At this point, it takes a while as the program starts to pre-process files for a preview. Give it time. When the preview starts, you can click the Video/Audio/Subs button and change output bitrates, sizes or frames - but it's fine to let it use the default settings.
Once the preview starts, click Add Job, and then Start. This confused me a bit, as Start couldn't be used until Add Job had been clicked.
Go away for a long time. My 3ghz P4 HT takes about 2:1 (2 minutes to encode each minute of video). Maybe a bit longer. It makes two passes. In my case, 50 minute videos took 2+ hours to convert.
CLAD suggests an AVI editor, but I found that Windows Movie Maker worked just fine for "trimming" the clips.
Start WMM. Then FILE/IMPORT and find your AVI. (I uncheck the "make clips" so my AVI is one long file, rather than billions of little ones to deal with.) Drag it down to the timeline below.
Move the slider to where you want to split your clip, then under the preview window on the right, find the two razor blades and click. (You can click on and delete the part you don't want. Don't worry, it's not gone from your hard drive, just off the timeline.) Move to the end of the part you want, and use the blade again.
Now out of an hour video, I have my 45 second clip! Choose FILE/SAVE MOVIE FILE, or just "save to my computer" under Finish Movie. Put it wherever you put your training video files. (I have a Training folder in My Documents with a Video and Audio folder that I throw this stuff in.)
Now I can pretty easily import it into PowerPoint as a full screen slide, or put a button on my slide which links to the file and launches my external player if I need to do it that way.
I used WMM because it is easy, and already on my computer. But if I needed to bring clips together, title them, fades, etc I probably would have used something more powerful. (Again, I use Premiere - but no sense
doing that in this case.)
And, I ended up with very high quality finished media clips that I was happy to use in my presentations.  It was, however, WAY more work than I really wanted to do to just get a couple of short legal video clips.


Google DRM and Copyright

 


October 2006 Google bought Youtube.com

2/14/06 Google Video DRM:
Why is Hollywood more important than users? 2/14/06

Google DRM and Copyright

Google's DRM has the potential to drastically re-shape the contours of copyright law, turning a few entertainment companies' wishful thinking about the way that copyright would work if they were running the show into de facto laws.

Some examples of user-rights that Google Video DRM takes away:
    * Under US copyright law, once you buy a video, you acquire a number of rights to it, including the right to re-sell it, loan it to a friend, donate it to your kid's school and so on. But with Google Video DRM, none of this is possible: your video is locked to your account and player.
    * Educators, archivists, academics, parodists and others have the right to excerpt, copy, archive and use any video in their work, under the US doctrine of fair use. However, Google's DRM tool stops them from doing this, and Google's video can't be played on anyone else's tool.
When I questioned Google Video's Peter Chane about this, he said that Google DRM is "user-friendly" -- but none of the user rights embodied in the US copyright law are accommodated by Google's DRM. Google's view of "user-friendly" only encompasses the design of the user-interface, not the rights that users enjoy under the law.
Revocation and Changing the Deal
Google DRM player can be "revoked" -- field updated without user permission or intervention. This isn't the standard in media players -- for example, iTunes requires that you explicitly grant permission to the application before it updates. Where auto-update prevails, the possibility for abuse is dramatic -- for example, a magistrate once tried to get ReplayTV to field-update the units it had sold to monitor its customers' use of the device as part of a dispute about the legality of one of its features. The idea was that the spyware would be implemented to gather the information required for the trial. The owners of ReplayTVs were the potential victims there, having products they'd purchased crippled after the fact (a judge overturned the magistrate's idea before it could be implemented, but other companies, such as AOL, have been forced to field-update their software to court order).
Google DRM auto-updating raises the possibility that some day the same thing might happen to them -- either because Google was ordered by a court to do so, or because one of Google's customers responds to news of Google's DRM being defeated (Chane and other DRM manufacturers universally acknowledge that all DRMs will eventually be subverted by their attackers) with a demand to "update" the software in a way that changes what few rights Google does give you when you buy your movies from them.
Google won't comment on whether they've entered into any arrangements with their suppliers that would require them to do this, and there lies the problem. Your ongoing enjoyment of the property you buy from Google is dependent on their ongoing relationship with their suppliers. If you buy a Warner Brothers DVD from Tower Records, it doesn't affect you in the least if Tower and Warners have an ugly dispute. You've bought it, it's yours. But with Google DRM, auto-update means that it's never really yours. Third parties always have the possibility of taking away the rights you bought, after you bought them.
In other words, your Google movies only play on Google's player, and no one but Google gets to make a Google player.
This is particularly worrisome in the case of the Google DRM system because it requires that you have a live Internet connection to Google every time you want to play a movie.

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