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Creoles of the World

American English Speech Recordings: A Guide to Collections.
A directory of collections of audio recordings of varieties of American English spoken in North America and including English-based creoles contains information about collections of any size, classified according to the primary state in the U.S. represented by the speakers in the sample and cross-referenced when more than one state is represented in the collection. Collections covering areas outside the United States are grouped separately, and include the Bahamas, Canada, Central America, Puerto Rico, England, and world-wide sources. The data, based on a survey, include information on each collection's location, institutional affiliation, content, characteristics of the sample, number of subjects recorded, number of hours recorded, dates and locations of taping, average length of the samples, contexts (free speech with or without interviewer directed interview, data elicitation, reading, or other), predominant or outstanding features of the content, subject or technical characteristics, access to Collections, and availableresearch reports concerning the collection. The survey questionnaire is provided in the introductory section of the directory. PDF

English around the World - Internet + English = Netglish

Definitions of Various Creoles

Creole - Kreyol Alphabet Alphabè Kreyòl la The Kreyol Alphabet






Bermudian English Creole

Jamaican Creole

Development of the Jamaican Language
Sources of language influence on Jamaican Creole Source of Jamaican population, 1500 - 1700 [more]

Trinidad Creole

English English

Spanish Based Creole

Haitian Creole


French Creole

Guinea-Bissau Creole

Dissertation: Guinea-Bissau Creole by Chiara Truppi

Brief description: My dissertation is a syntactic-semantic study of GBC bare nouns and the theoretical implications. Moreover, GBC nominal system and its bare nouns are compared to a number of other creole and noncreole languages: Cape Verdean Creole, Santome, Papiamentu, Brazilian Portuguese, Mandarin Chinese, Vietnamese and Gbe languages.

Future in Nova Scotian Black English

2000 Global Internet Statistics (by Language) lists many languages, how many people speak each language, how many people who speak that language have internet access, the GDP (gross domestic product) per capita for each language ... "We classify by languages instead of by countries, since people speaking the same language form their own online community no matter what country they happen to live in."
"While English is the language of choice on the Internet, it will hasten the extinction of thousands of indigenous languages. By the end of this century, 90 percent of the world's language could become extinct. The culture, customs and knowledge embedded in these languages will also become extinct. As we embrace the languages of former colonial masters, the world losses valuable information passed down by word of mouth over several generations. The extinction of any language is an irretrievable loss to humanity. If the early years of educational instruction are not in an indigenous language, then that language is headed for extinction." -- Dr. Philip Emeagwali

Author: Kofi Yakpo Dissertation Title: A Grammar of Pichi
Linguistic Field(s): Language Documentation
Subject Language(s): Fernando Po Creole English (fpe)
Language Family(ies): Creole
Dissertation Abstract: Pichi (also know as Fernando Po Creole English) is an Atlantic English-lexicon Creole spoken on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea.
With at least 70,000 speakers, Pichi is an offshoot of Krio (Sierra Leone) and shares many characteristics with its West African sister languages Aku (Gambia) and Nigerian, Cameroonian and Ghanaian Pidgin. At the same time,
contact with Spanish, the colonial and official language of Equatorial Guinea, has made a significant impact on the lexicon and grammar of Pichi.
This first comprehensive description of Pichi is based on extensive fieldwork in Equatorial Guinea. It presents a detailed analysis of the phonology, morphology and syntax of the language and addresses language contact between Pichi and Spanish. The annexes contain a collection of interlinearised and annotated texts as well as Pichi-English-Pichi vocabulary lists.
Pichi has a seven vowel system and twenty-two consonant phonemes. The
language features a mixed prosodic system which employs both pitch-accent and tone. The morphological structure of Pichi is largely isolating. However, there is a limited use of inflectional and derivational morphology in which affixation, tone and suppletive forms are put to use. The categories of tense, modality and aspect are primarily expressed through preverbal particles. In Pichi, aspect rather than tense, plays a dominant role in expressing temporal relations. The modal system includes an indicative-subjunctive opposition. Pichi verbs fall into three lexical aspect classes: dynamic, inchoative-stative and stative. The language exhibits a subject-verb word order in intransitive clauses and a subject-verb-object order in transitive clauses. Pichi also features various types of multiverb constructions. These include secondary predication, clause chaining and serial verb constructions.

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