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Song Catching Worksheet

DEAR READER: THIS IS TOTALLY OPTIONAL AND NOT REQUIRED

BUT YOU ARE INVITED TO SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING IF

1) YOU HAVE RECORDED YOUR MUSIC AND IT IS ON YOUR COMPUTER.

2) SELECT AND COPY EVERYTHING BELOW AND PASTE IT INTO YOUR EMAIL AND FILL IN YOUR ANSWERS

3) THEN ATTACH YOUR MUSIC FILE TO YOUR EMAIL

  1. What is the name of a childhood song that you learned from someone else?
  2. What are the lyrics to the first verse of the song?
  3. Is the song sung in English or another language?
  4. Are there gestures or movements to go with the song?
  5. Have you changed the song since you learned it? If "yes," how?
  6. When, where, with whom, and how often do you sing the song? Is it on an ordinary or special occasion?
  7. Describe who taught you the song.
  8. If you could teach the song to someone, who would it be, and why?
  9. Do you share any songs with other students at your school? Describe. Are there movements you do to the song?
  10. What music is shared only between girls? Only between boys? Describe differences that you see.

Adapted from www.louisianavoices.org.

SELECT AND COPY EVERYTHING BELOW AND PASTE IT INTO YOUR EMAIL AND FILL IN YOUR ANSWERS

Name of Your Song or Chant:

Your State:

Your Town + zip code:

Your Grade:

Your Age{s}:

Date Submitted:

Where Are You? Name of Place:

*Personal Information is Optional and you will not be personally identifiable.

* Your Name{s}
* Teacher's Name
* Teacher e-mail

Educational CyberPlayGround, Inc. ®
Gulph MIlls, PA 19428
Study is being conducted by the Educational CyberPlayGround.
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Encouraging public awareness, understanding, and appreciation of folk arts traditions through creation of an online archive for recording and preserving community-based traditions by honoring individual unknown cultural makers and the artistry of our nation's children.

P.L. 94-201, The American Folklife Preservation Act of 1976 (20 USC 2101), which created the American Folklife Center, states the following: http://lcweb.loc.gov/folklife/teachers.html

That the diversity inherent in American folklife has contributed greatly to the cultural richness of the Nation and has fostered a sense of individuality and identity among the American people; . . .
[and] that it is in the interest of the general welfare of the Nation to preserve, support, revitalize, and disseminate American folklife traditions and arts. . . .
The term "American folklife" means the traditional expressive culture shared within the various groups in the United States: familial, ethnic, occupational, religious, regional; expressive culture includes a wide range of creative and symbolic forms such as custom, belief, technical skill, language, literature, art, architecture, music, play, dance, drama, ritual, pageantry, handicraft; these expressions are mainly learned orally, by imitation, or in performance, and are generally maintained without benefit of formal instruction or institutional direction.

THE AMERICAN FOLKLIFE CENTER
The American Folklife Center was established in 1976 by a Title 20 Education Act, the American Folklife Preservation Act (P.L. 94-201). It is a small and versatile organization designed to operate in cooperation with other federal state and local agencies and organizations and to initiate independent programs using its own resources. It is mandated by Congress to engage in a broad range of educational and research activities that preserve, revitalize, and present America's rich and diverse cultural heritage --a heritage associated with ethnic, regional, and occupational cultures.

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