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©1993 K-12 American School Directory

FIRST AND OLDEST ONLINE K-12 SCHOOL DIRECTORY IN THE WORLD

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Educational CyberPlayGround ®
HOSTS K12 INTERNET HISTORY

The K-12 School Directory is organized by state and by grade level.

CLICK ON YOUR STATE TO BROWSE THE SCHOOLS
Alaska Hawaii Puerto Rico US Virgin Islands California Oregon Washington Idaho Montana North Dakota South Dakota Nevada Wyoming Utah Colorado Arizona New Mexico Texas Nebraska Kansas Oklahoma Louisiana Arkansas Missouri Iowa Minnesota Michigan Wisconsin Illinois Rhode Island Indiana Ohio Kentucky Tennessee Mississippi Alabama Georgia Florida South Carolina North Carolina Virginia West Virginia Pennsylvania New York Maine District of Columbia Delaware Maryland Connecticut Massachusetts Vermont New Hampshire New Jersey Educational CyberPlayGround K-12 School Directory ©1993 US MAP
Educational CyberPlayGround, Inc.®   K-12 American School Directory   ©1993!
A  "new schools"  means that schools from this state were added or updated in the past 15 days.

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US Territories
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ABOUT OUR K12
INTERNET HISTORY

Unknown Culture Makers:
Gleason Sackmann and
Karen Ellis

gman

By 1993 Internet pioneer Gleason Sackmann started collecting the first school websites that came online.This is the first website in the United States to collect school websites. It is a public folklore project. Gleason sent the information to his NetHappenings mailing list readers, the oldest K-12 Mailing list that started in 1989.

Thanks to the Educational CyberPlayGround who kept our history alive and current through the past 20+ years on the net! First to wire North Dakota's K-16 schools to the internet retired in 2004.

Please submit
your school
WEBSITE ADDRESS
Our friend K-12 Internet Pioneer Gleason Sackmann
was the person who thought to announce the very first U.S. school websites that went up on the net. We honor my friend's tradition and kept the directory of K-12 schools going.

Before Gleason retired he asked me to keep this project going, and I was honored and happy to become the new Culture Keeper of Nations K-12 Education online activity!!

This is now and always has been a Public Folklore Project, built by the nation, for us and by us. We are the "Folk" the unknown culture makers who built the net and the content on it.


Arbor Heights Elementary in Seattle, Washington
ONE OF THE FIRST SCHOOL WEBSITES ON THE NET
was either the 9th or 10th elementary school with a web site in the world and started August 14, 1994
It's still sitting on the same little spot of cyberspace it's had since 1994: Still an active school site, it was one of the first on the web, it spawned the Earth DayGroceries Project, and it is home to the Random Thoughts of Louis Schmier. Stop by for a visit, ortake a little historical tour: dedicated to the many teachers who keep their school web sites going on their own time. -Teacher Mark Ahlness

Search for every Elementary, middle and high school information for public, private, charter, virtual schools nationwide that are regionally accredited. Also find State and regional education organizations.

Moving to a
new School?

 

TRANSPARENCY:

State accountability systems are a "disaster."

Who decides the indicators? State legislature, a commission, a state board, how many kids pass tests?

Ask the Teacher if Your Child Reads On Grade Level!
9 out of 10 parents no matter their race, ethnicity, or income believe their child is on grade level. 9 out of 10 parents are wrong.

An analysis of reading and math test score data from across the country confirms just how much socioeconomic conditions matter. Children in the school districts with the highest concentrations of poverty score an average of more than four grade levels below children in the richest districts.

RATE YOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT:
How Does Your School District Compare?

Find a District
The analysis should not be used to rank districts or schools. Test scores reflect not just the quality of schools or their teachers, but all kinds of other factors in children’s lives, including their home environment; whether they attended a good preschool; traumas they have experienced; and whether their parents read to them at night or hire tutors. What emerges clearly in the data is the extent to which race and class are inextricably linked, and how that connection is exacerbated in school settings.

US School District per pupil spending
How Per-Pupil Spending Compares Across U.S. School Districts
The school finance analysis comes from Education Week's Quality Counts 2016, which provides details on how states allocate funding to public schools and grades them, taking into account overall spending and the equity with which that funding is distributed among districts.

The Circles of American Financial Hell
Poverty doesn’t describe the situation of middle-class Americans, who by definition earn decent incomes and live in relative material comfort. Yet they are in financial distress. For people earning between $40,000 and $100,000 (i.e. not the very poorest), 44 percent said they could not come up with $400 in an emergency (either with cash or with a credit card whose bill they could pay off within a month). Even more astonishing, 27 percent of those making more than $100,000 also could not. This is not poverty. So what is it?
There’s no escaping the pressure that U.S. inequality exerts on parents to make sure their kids succeed.
The relentless drive to spend any money available comes from the pressure people feel to provide their kids with access to the best schools they can afford (purchased, in most cases, not via tuition but via real estate in a specific public-school district). Breaking the bank for your kids’ education is, to an extent, perfectly reasonable.


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