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GET OFF FACEBOOK NOW

So Many Problems with Facebook

#Privacy #howtogetofftheinternet #facebook #underage kid

Facebook, as a private company, does NOT have to agree or hold themselves to any ethical standards.

2016

The Facebook Messenger mobile app now has a “secret conversation” mode providing end-to-end encryption that even Facebook cannot decrypt.

Reasons not to use Facebook by Richard Stallman

What Facebook Knows About You
This is the same information that Facebook itself offers users — buried deep in its site. (It’s in a section of its settings called “Ad Preferences.”) It’s not clear if this data represents all that Facebook knows about a person. For instance, we haven’t yet seen anyone with credit card or property ownership listed. Which is why we’re particularly interested in hearing what you found out. You can help us examine whether what Facebook says it knows matches up with the categories it sells.

98 personal data points that Facebook uses to target ads to you

THE UNOFFICIAL FACEBOOK TREASURE MAP
Vulnerabilities you shouldn’t write about

Facebook and Microsoft Are Laying a Giant Cable Across the Atlantic

Facebook begins tracking non-users around the internet display ads to web users who are not members of its social network. Facebook will use cookies, "like" buttons, and other plug-ins embedded on third-party sites to track members and non-members alike. The company says it will be able to better target non-Facebook users and serve relevant ads to them, though its practices have come under criticism from regulators in Europe over privacy concerns.


Facebook's "other" secret mailbox you didn't know you had!

Facebook has yet ANOTHER secret mailbox.

Click -> Messenger -> settings -> people ->filtered requests

You'll find messages from years  ago that you never new you had.

You know better than Facebook does about whose messages you want to get.

Want to take back control over your life and email messages? Delete your #Facebook account now.

2016

1) log into Facebook and go to your Ad Preferences setting
You should see a list of things Facebook think you’re interested in based on your internet habits, things FB thinks you're interested in. Under each category, you’ll see specific items. If you disagree, you’re free to delete them from your preferences.
2) Delete them all. Add back in only the “appropriate” advertisements about things you don't care about like "cheese puffs"

Facebook, which require you toaccess each app that connects to your Facebook account and discontinue the sharing agreement piecewise.

Theft, Lies, and Facebook Video

Theft, Lies, and Facebook Video
Facebook says it’s now streaming more video than YouTube. To be able to make that claim, all they had to do was cheat, lie, and steal.

2015

Delete your #Facebook

Facebook lawsuit leads top EU court to rule data-sharing pact with U.S. invalid.
Facebook and thousands of other companies could find it vastly more complicated to do business in Europe after a court ruled that personal data sent to U.S. servers is potentially unsafe from government spying. Some 4,500 companies have long been able to store users' personal data -- everything from status updates and photos to personal information like bank details and home addresses -- where they see fit, often in the U.S. That could change after Europe's top court on Tuesday declared invalid a 15-year-old pact allowing the unfettered transfer of personal data outside the European Union's 28 countries. The case was brought by an Austrian law student in the wake of revelations by former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden of the extent of the NSA's surveillance programs.
Max Schrems complained that U.S. law doesn't offer sufficient protection against surveillance of data transferred by Facebook to servers in the United States. The verdict could have far-reaching implications for companies operating in Europe. It does not mean companies have to immediately stop transferring data to the U.S. Rather, it opens up the possibility that European regulators will be inundated by complaints by consumers who do not want their data stored in the U.S. That would make it hugely difficult for companies to do business.
"The message is clear -- that mass surveillance is not possible and against fundamental rights in Europe," said Schrems after the ruling. Companies, he added, "cannot just aid foreign spies and get away with it because they fall under European jurisdiction." The so-called "safe harbor" agreement has allowed companies to send data on users from the EU to U.S. since 2000. That includes information on how users behave online, such as what pages they visit and where they spend money. But also email addresses, passwords, bank details and payroll figures. It does not include the content of emails, however. Since its creation, the agreement has helped Internet businesses such as social media.
Facebook and Google, for example, earn money from advertising that relies on data on how users behave on the Internet. But the revelations of NSA spying have provoked a backlash from European consumers and governments. In a separate case, for example, Google is being forced to consider Europeans' requests to delete from its search results links to content that they find offensive or inappropriate. The European Commission, the EU's executive branch, has tried to revise the "safe harbor" agreement over the past two years and expects Tuesday's ruling will support that effort. "Today's judgment is an important step toward upholding Europeans' fundamental rights to data protection," said European Commission Vice President Frans Timmermans. "In the light of the ruling we will continue this work toward a renewed and safe framework for the transfer of personal data across the Atlantic." In Washington, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said there are concerns about the economic consequences of the ruling, which is being reviewed. "We are disappointed that the court has struck down an agreement that since 2000 has proved to be critical in protecting both privacy and fostering economic growth in the United States and the European Union," Earnest said. He said the administration believes the decision was based "on incorrect assumptions about data privacy protections in the United States." He said the U.S. will work with the EU to provide certainty to companies by releasing an updated framework. The U.S. and the EU will continue working to reach an updated data sharing agreement. Schrems, the Austrian student, complained to the data protection authorities in Ireland, where Facebook has its European headquarters, that his information was not safe on U.S. servers. Irish authorities initially rejected his complaint, pointing to the "safe harbor" agreement. Now, the Irish data commissioner will now be required to "decide whether ... transfer of the data of Facebook's European subscribers to the United States should be suspended on the ground that that country does not afford an adequate level of protection of personal data," the court said. In a statement, Facebook said it's now "imperative that EU and U.S. governments ensure that they continue to provide reliable methods for lawful data transfers and resolve any issues relating to national security." AmCham EU, which represents U.S. companies across all sectors in the EU, said the ruling could have serious implications for economic activity. Reaching a new agreement on data sharing will be difficult, says professor Felix Wu of Cardozo Law School in New York. "Safe harbor was never designed to address U.S. government surveillance," he said. Because the 4th Amendment protecting U.S. citizens' privacy does not apply to people outside the U.S., the data agreement cannot adequately protect Europeans' data stored in the U.S. If European authorities are inundated with complaints about data being stored in the U.S., companies may opt to set up more of their business in Europe. That's what SWIFT, the international financial payments processor, did.
Meanwhile, Schrems was lauded by Snowden, the former NSA contractor who flew to Moscow two years ago after revealing information about the agency's eavesdropping. "You've changed the world for the better," Snowden said in a tweet.

EU-U.S. Data Sharing Deal Can't Be Trusted, Top Court Aide Says

Facebook won't let you type Tsu.co on Facebook or Instagram -- or even in a private conversation on Facebook Messenger. It won't work. Tsu is a tiny new social network that claims to share its advertising revenue with its users. Unlike most social media sites, including Facebook, which keep 100% of the profit from the ads displayed on your page, Tsu only keeps 10%. You keep 45%. The chain of friends that invited you to Tsu split the rest. That means there's a financial incentive to post on Tsu, invite people to Tsu, and direct people to your Tsu page. There's even incentive to send people to the Tsu pages of the folks who you brought into the Tsu network.

Facebook warns users of potential state-sponsored attacks Those who see the alert are advised to wipe their systems. Facebook will now warn people if it has a strong suspicion an account is being targeted by a nation-state.

SURVEILLANCE - BIG BROTHER
Facebook
wants an "image fingerprinting" patent US 20150124107 for another way to track you that would identify YOUR CAMERA used to shoot a photo. It would even recognize photos of yours that are uploaded to accounts, say, other than yours.

Facebook Wants to Redline Your Friends List
The company recently filed a patent on using social network data to influence lending decisions. In short: You could be denied a loan simply because your friends have defaulted on theirs. It’s the kind of digital redlining that critics of “big data” collection have been warning of for years. It could make Facebook a lot of money, and it could make the Web even less safe for poor people. And it could be just the beginning.

Facebook and Your Credit
Facebook has obtained a patent on a method for "authenticating an individual for access to information or service based on that individual's social network." Among other things, the patent says, the invention could be used by lenders as follows: "When an individual applies for a loan, the lender examines the credit ratings of members of the individual's social network who are connected to the individual through authorized nodes.  If the average credit rating of these members is at least a minimum credit score, the lender continues to process the loan application.  Otherwise, the loan application is rejected."  Wow.

Could lenders really use the credit of a person's Facebook friends to deny that person a loan?

Get
off
facebook
now

Facebook has updated its privacy policy to say that it can now track your every move on the internet, even when you're logged out of the app! "It takes into account pages and places visited on Facebook, alongside browsing on the internet at large."

FACEBOOK EXPERIMENTS WITH YOU

 

Facebook’s mood-altering experiment "Who knows what other research they're doing."

An ethicist on Facebook and human subject research. Columbia ethics professor Bob Klitzman has written this understandable analysis of the Facebook mood experiment research.
Klitzman concludes that the experiment "violates accepted research ethics" and explains why.  He writes:  "research must respect the rights of individual research subjects, and scientific investigators must therefore explain to participants the purposes of the study, describe the procedures (and which of these are experimental) and 'any reasonably foreseeable risks or discomforts' … Facebook followed none of these mandates."

Ed Gerck~ Without validly discarding the 'null hypothesis' the experiment results are not scientific. The authors should have  considered and tested  the 'null hypothesis' as a possible explanation, that there's no emotion state change needed in order to explain the relationship.  However, there is no  null hypothesis. So, how about "copy and paste" and its "copycat" cousin as a null hypothesis? Users often "copy and paste" previous remarks, such as "This is cool!" or use the same language -- people read "exciting" and write ... "exciting".  There's no emotion change needed in just copying, and may even be a way to not be emotionally involved, to make no decisions. In other words, the reported FB results could be mostly emotion-neutral or even emotion-avoiding ... mostly an echo-chamber rather than mostly emotion-changing.

ARE YOU DEAD?

 

@CyberPlayGround October 23, 2014

HOW WILL YOU GET OFF FACEBOOK?

Facebook rolls out feature for users when they die

 

FACEBOOK KEEPS YOUR HISTORY

Facebook Will Use Your Browsing and Apps History For Ads (Despite Saying It Wouldn't 3 Years Ago) Facebook's big blue hand is reaching out to scoop up more of your data for monetization. Company Also Rolls Out Beefed-up Privacy Controls, but Won't Honor Do-Not-Track Browser Setting. On smartphones, any apps that use Facebook log-in or have Facebook "Likes" in their apps will send information back to Facebook for advertising. Facebook is using "conversion pixels" to track users. This is a bit of code that companies that are advertising on Facebook can throw onto their websites to track whether their Facebook ads are working.purposes.

 

Surveillance Facebook App Knows What You’re Hearing, Watching
Facebook is strip-mining human society. Watching everyone share everything in their social lives and instrumenting the web to surveil everything they read outside the system is inherently unethical. But we need no more from Facebook than truth in labelling. We need no rules, no punishments, no guidelines. We need nothing but the truth. Facebook should lean in and tell its users what it does. It should say: "We watch you every minute that you're here. We watch every detail of what you do. We have wired the web with 'like' buttons that inform on your reading automatically." To every parent Facebook should say: "Your children spend hours every day with us. We spy upon them much more efficiently than you will ever be able to. And we won't tell you what we know about them." Only that, just the truth. That will be enough. But the crowd that runs Facebook, that small bunch of rich and powerful people, will never lean in close enough to tell you the truth. Mark Zuckerberg recently spent $30m (£18m) buying up all the houses around his own in Palo Alto, California. Because he needs more privacy. <source>

get off Facebook !!

 

Facebook makes it very obvious how to deactivate your account; it's under

Account Settings > Security > Deactivate your account.

Don't be fooled! Deactivation isn't deletion, and when you chose this option, Facebook holds on to all your bits and pieces just in case you change your mind. (baloney they want your info forever)

To truly nuke your account, you need to head to the
Delete My Account page and click the big blue button.

That's it, you're officially off Facebook.

The process might take up to two weeks to complete since the system has to scan the entirety of itself making sure all data related to you — every tagged picture, like, and mention — but when it's gone, it's all gone. The process is irreversible.

Don't worry, though; if you still want that treasure trove of pictures and updates living on your hard drive, you can download the whole shebang by going to:
Account Settings > General > Download a copy of your Facebook Data > Start My Archive.

 

How do I permanently delete my account?

If you deactivate your account, your timeline disappears from the Facebook service immediately. People on Facebook won't be able to search for you, though some info, like messages you sent, may still be visible to others. We also save your timeline information (ex: friends, photos, interests, etc.) in case you want to come back

If you don't think you'll use Facebook again, you can request to have your account permanently deleted. Please keep in mind that you won't be able to reactivate your account or retrieve any of the content or information you've added. Before you do this, you may want to download a copy of your info from Facebook. Then, if you'd like your account permanently deleted with no option for recovery, log in to your account and fill out this form.

If you can't log in to your account, you'll need to reset your password first. To do this, go to www.facebook.com and click the Forgot your password? link below the password field. Once you’ve followed the instructions to reset your password and can log into your account, you can deactivate or delete your account using the steps outlined above.

Kiss ass fans of #Zuckerberg kiss Chinese ass who censors facebook spy tool only brown nosing for money -- Aaah Sooooo What! http://t.co/5B2w3j2KnC

get off Twitter

 

 

Unlike on Facebook, on Twitter deactivate means delete. And it's easy!

Go to Account Settings > Deactivate my account > Okay, fine, deactivate account. Then just enter your password and you're good to go.

Well, almost, anyway. Twitter also holds onto your info in case you have quitter's remorse, so it'll still stick around on the company's servers for 30 days. After that, though, you're all clear.

get off LinkedIn

 

Get off Linkedin is another easy one.

Head to the upper right hand corner of the page, and select

Privacy & Settings from the drop-down menu.

From there, head to

Account > Close Your Account.

Answer a quick question about why you're leaving (as if you need a reason!), verify your account one more time, and then revel in the fact that you'll never get LinkedIn spam again.

It'll take a while for all professional network traces of you to leave Google and other search engines, but you'll be purged before long.

get off Google+

 

 

There's a decent chance you're a Google+ member without even realizing it — which makes leaving all the more compelling. It's also the most convoluted process of the four.

The important thing here is to delete your Google+ information and account without nuking your Google account.

To get rid of just your public information, first sign into Google+

Click your name and/or email address in the upper right hand corner, and go to Account Management > Delete Google+ content strong. That'll take care of profile, your Circles, your +1s, etc. 

To get rid of your entire Google+ account, meanwhile, repeat the above process, but select Delete your entire Google profile.

This sounds scary! It's not. You'll still be able to use Gmail, your Google Drive, and so on. It will, however, totally vanish your Google+ presence, and will make for some annoyances if you've coupled it with other Google accounts (most commonly YouTube).

If you really want to go all the way with this and delete the entirety of your Google account Google Account Close account and delete all services and info associated with it, and kiss Gmail and every other Google-thing you love goodbye.

HOW TO GET OFF THE INTERENT

The Federal Trade Commission now allows companies who run background checks and to compile seven years worth of publicly-available files and data from social networks and websites of the like. If you haven't yet privatized the information on your online accounts, you should. Social Intelligence doesn't store seven years worth of your social data. Rather it looks at up to seven years of your history, and stores nothing.

LOOK YOURSELF UP

Public Databases look for your name, address, and age.

How to remove yourself from each of these have been listed below.
All of this data is public data. The data itself isn't going away, opting out just makes people who want to find it have to look a little harder.

You may want too scan some form of ID such as a state issued ID like a drivers license.
Black out your picture and drivers number. Leaving your name, address and DOB visible. Any sites that requires such a thing will have an * after the address.

OPT OUT


Facebook Parenting: For the troubled teen.

 

SOCIAL NETWORKS EXPLAINED
#21st century Literacy Skills

CLICK HERE IF YOU NEED HELP WITH A FACEBOOK PROBLEM


 

Mark Zuckerberg, David Kirkpatrick, and Guy Raz:The Facebook Effect

 

 

HACKING FACEBOOK PRIVACY - Chris Conley ACLU
cconley@aclunc.org

 

 

Children under 13 who post personal information on Facebook can be seen by the public!

Using Facebook presents children and their friends and families with safety, security, and privacy risks.


 

Facebook censorship transparency report

4/11/2014 Facebook show which countries censor citizens' news feeds

TIME “Facebook’s mission is to give people the power to share, and to make the world more open and connected,” Colin Stretch, Facebook’s general counsel, said in a transparency report that was released Friday. “Sometimes, the laws of a country interfere with that mission, by limiting what can be shared there.” If a country’s complaint is proven valid given local laws—Facebook’s next report may reveal how many times requests are denied—then Facebook removes the content for users only in that region. This is the first time the social network has disclosed how often it allows governments to remove or restrict content for legal reasons.

2012 Unique gadget identifiers -- called UDIDs -- engage in high-level spying on American citizens via their iPhones, iPads, and iPod Touch devices. Blue Toad is a little-known privately held company, but its technology touches millions of users around the world.  It provides private-label digital edition and app-building services to 6,000 different publishers, and serves 100 million page views each month, DeHart said. He declined to discuss business partners, but said the list of clients includes household names. DeHart said his firm would not be contacting individual consumers to notify them that their information had been compromised, instead leaving it up to individual publishers to contact readers as they see fit.


 

Social Networks: How to report a problem and get an underage kid off facebook.

If your preteenager uses Facebook, delete the account or ask Facebook to by using its "report an underage child" form.

Parents of young children might think they are less likely to take risks, but those parents would be mistaken. Ten-year-olds need protection from other hazards that might lurk on the Internet, such as links that infect their computer with malware and invitations from strangers, not to mention bullies.


 

Facebook is, of course, at the center of consumer privacy debate because it can serve up unprecedented amounts of information, including age, gender, consumer preferences, likes, friends, and behavioral and psychographic information by way of an API. Marketers are actively tapping Facebook and other social networks by inviting you to use social network-enabled mobile applications, encouraging you to log into their site using your Facebook credentials, or otherwise asking permission to access your profile.


 

So, What are your children doing on the net?
What are they putting up there?

Do K-12 Students Understand that Facebook is Public?



Teachers and Facebook


 

Facebook Reporting Guide

FACEBOOK security team says:

The safety and security of the people who use our site is of paramount importance to everyone here at Facebook. We are all working tirelessly at iterating our reporting system to provide the best possible support for the people who use our site. While the complexity of our system may be bewildering we hope that this note and infographic has increased your understanding of our processes. And, even though we hope you don’t ever need to report content on Facebook, you will now know exactly what happened to that report and how it was routed.

If you think about it, this team is basically the online equivalent of your local police force.

Warning: I'm going to read a letter my 15 year old daughter wrote. There ARE some curse words in it. None of them are incredibly bad, but they are definitely things a little kid shouldn't hear... not to mention things MY KID shouldn't say!
If you want to see the original Facebook thread, it's located at:
http://www.facebook.com/tommyjordaniii/posts/299559803434210

 

My daughter thought it would be funny/rebellious/cool to post on her Facebook wall just how upset she was and how unfair her life here is; how we work her too hard with chores, never pay her for chores, and just in general make her life difficult.
She chose to share this with the entire world on Facebook and block her parent's from seeing it. Well, umm... she failed. As of the end of this video, she won't have to worry anymore about posting inappropriate things on Facebook...
Maybe a few kids can take something away from this... If you're so disrespectful to your parents and yourself as to post this kind of thing on Facebook, you're deserving of some tough love. Today, my daughter is getting a dose of tough love.


Hate Facebook want privacy?
anti-oversharing start-ups include GroupMe, Frenzy, Rally Up, Shizzlr, Huddl and Bubbla

 

 

Application Platforms

Application Platforms like Twitter are like sharecropping. You are the sharecropper. You get to work on the farm, but you don't get to own the farm. The owners of the social networking platforms, get to call the shots, and at any point you can lose your farm which is the same thing as losing your domain name, access to your accrued data, and any kind of community you may have created. We are treated like sharecroppers on social networks. We would be better off if we constructed a network ourselves, because networks don't really matter. At some point the technology won't make me sign up for every single one of these networks, and we don't want to duplicate our social network or duplicate all of this work multiple times.

There Is Something wrong with Facebook and any other technology when the terms of the bargain is to allow websites to swap your personal information for convenient access to their sites - with the companies that operate the networks - collecting ever more information about their users. That information can and will be sold to marketers. When you give up that data, you're giving it up forever. The value they give us is negligible in the scale of what they are doing, and what we are giving up is all of our privacy.

Department Of Defense going after social network sites.

New Scientist Magazine has discovered that Pentagon's National Security Agency, which specialises in eavesdropping and code-breaking, is funding research into the mass harvesting of the information that people post about themselves on social networks. And it could harness advances in internet technology - specifically the forthcoming "semantic web" championed by the web standards organisation W3C - to combine data from social networking websites with details such as banking, retail and property records, allowing the NSA to build extensive, all-embracing personal profiles of individuals. See Security and Privacy

Facebook is a centralized social network used for spying.
Ilya Zhitomirskiy, Dan Grippi, Max Salzberg, and Raphael Sofaer decided to build a social network that wouldn't force people to surrender their privacy to a big business. They have called their project Diaspora* and intend to distribute the software free, and to make the code openly available so that other programmers can build on it. Share what you want, with whom you want. To manage your privacy on Facebook, you will need to navigate through 50 settings with more than 170 options. Facebook says it wants to offer precise controls for sharing on the Internet. http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/05/12/business/facebook-privacy.html

 

cops subpoena your Facebook information

 

When the cops subpoena your Facebook information, here's what Facebook sends the cops.

One of the most fascinating documents we came across was the BPD's subpoena of Philip Markoff's Facebook information. It's interesting for a number of reasons -- for one thing, Facebook has been pretty tight-lipped about the subpoena process, even refusing to acknowledge how many subpoenas they've served. Social-networking data is a contested part of a complicated legal ecosystem -- in some cases, courts have found that such data is protected by the Stored Communications Act.

In fact, we'd never seen an executed Facebook subpoena before -- but here we have one, including the forms that Boston Police filed to obtain the information, and the printed (on paper!) response that Facebook sent back, which includes text printouts of Markoff's wall posts, photos he uploaded as well as photos he was tagged in, a comprehensive list of friends with their Facebook IDs (which we've redacted), and a long table of login and IP data. 

This document was publicly released by Boston Police as part of the case file. In other case documents, the police have clearly redacted sensitive information. And while the police were evidently comfortable releasing Markoff's unredacted Facebook subpoena, we weren't. Markoff may be dead, but the very-much-alive friends in his friend list were not subpoenaed, and yet their full names and Facebook ID's were part of the document. So we took the additional step of redacting as much identifying information as we could -- knowing that any redaction we performed would be imperfect, but believing that there's a strong argument for distributing this, not only for its value in illustrating the Markoff case, but as a rare window into the shadowy process by which Facebook deals with law enforcement. 

As far as we can tell, nobody's ever seen what one of these looks like -- and we're hoping the social media, law, and privacy experts out there can glean insight from it: 

There is something wrong.

There are Dead People on Facebook
The world's biggest social network, knows a lot about its roughly 500 million members. Its software is quick to offer helpful nudges about things like imminent birthdays and friends you have not contacted in a while. But the company has had trouble automating the task of figuring out when one of its users has died. That can lead to some disturbing or just plain weird moments for Facebook users as the site keeps on shuffling a dead friend through its social algorithms. Facebook says it has been grappling with how to handle the ghosts in its machine but acknowledges that it has not found a good solution. Now, people over 65 are adopting Facebook at a faster pace than any other age group, with 6.5 million signing up in May alone, three times as many as in May 2009, according to the research firm comScore. People over 65, of course, also have the country's highest mortality rate, so the problem is only going to get worse. 2010

China, Russia, South Africa - And The Facebook Connection 12 Jan 2011
By Matthew Buckland at Memeburn There is something going on in China, Russia and South Africa. Via various internet investments and creations, these three countries combined have built up major stakes in some of the world's biggest sites and social networks. Russian investment company, Digital Sky Technologies (DST), now owns about 7-10% of Facebook by various estimates, putting the company among Facebook's biggest owners. Via its sister company Mail.ru, another 2.4% of Facebook is held. Recently, according to the New York Times, DST ploughed a further $50-million into Facebook. DST also owns about five percent of the popular social gaming company Zynga and another five percent of the prominent shopping-coupon company Groupon. The company is now apparently eyeing a piece of Twitter, but then again who isn't? The Mail.ru Group, which has grown into the biggest Internet company in the Russian-speaking world, owns 100% of Russian social networking site Odnoklassniki, and has a significant stake in the country's other major networking site, Vkontakte. DST also owns the early-web era instant messaging service ICQ, an interesting investment because the service is somewhat of a fading star.


The Chinese and South African connection

There is also a Chinese, and even a South African connection to the Russian group. South African emerging markets media giant Naspers, an $18-billion company, also owns a stake (reported at 28.7%) in DST, and therefore indirectly holds a stake in Facebook. Naspers also owns a chunk in TenCent's QQ, China's largest instant messenger and social network. In December 2010, QQ.com ranked 9th overall in Alexa's internet rankings, ahead of Twitter which ranked 10th. According to Business Day, TenCent had about 637-million registered users in December 2010. Ironically Naspers hails from a newspaper background, but started to make serious money via pay-TV operations in South Africa and throughout Africa. Naspers operates from a home market with a comparatively small internet user base of anywhere between 7-12 million South African users, so this may explain why the company has been aggressively fishing beyond its borders for internet properties. Naspers is headed by a tough, shrewd and ambitious Cape Town-based CEO in Koos Bekker. At home, the company owns the largest internet media player in News24, which attracts a modest -- by world standards -- five million monthly users. It also owns a piece of the South African MXit, a mobile-app-based IM now claiming around 25-30-million world-wide users. In 2001 Naspers bought the 46,5% piece of Tencent for $32m, making it the largest shareholder in the then three-year-old company. Then QQ had just 18-million accounts. As Tencent grew and turned into the world's third-largest dot-com by market value, the value of Naspers' stake jumped more than 400-fold to exceed R14bn. With these impressive figures, it appears that Tencent's QQ platform may be challenging Facebook as the world's largest social networking platform. They are not exactly comparable platforms because QQ is an IM first and a social network second. For Facebook it is the other way round. But a broad definition of "social network" -- a somewhat abused term these days -- could put the companies in the same category.
In September 2010, Naspers snapped up yet another social network, but this time in the US. The company bought a "controlling interest" in social networking site Multiply. Multiply, headquartered in Boca Raton, Florida, reportedly has more than 11-million registered users. Naspers also owns Indian social networking play Ibibo, as well as various ecommerce platforms in Eastern Europe, South America and other parts of Asia. The company holds 25% of Singapore-based BuzzCity, a mobile media company that runs a global advertising network on the mobile internet. Memeburn has it on good authority that Naspers sometime back had an opportunity to buy a piece of business networking site LinkedIn, but turned it down at the time -- a decision which has caused some regret at the company.
The Russians are not coming, they have in fact arrived.
On the other side of the world, the other figure leading this new emerging markets internet charge is the low-profile Internet tycoon Yury Milner. Milner is also the chairman of Mail.ru. The shaven-headed businessman trained as a physicist in Moscow before starting out as a manager at the World Bank. He began investing in the Russian Internet in the late 1990s and founded Mail.ru in 2001. A report in The New York Times noted that if DST had invested 50 million dollars (37.5 million euros) more in Facebook, its combined stake with Mail.ru would be worth about 500 million dollars. Mail.ru made its debut on the London stock exchange in November and was valued at 5.71 billion dollars on flotation. In a rare interview with business daily Vedomosti late in December 2010, Milner said that Mail.ru had "chosen a strategy to have a global expertise in a very narrow sector". He said that in every Internet sector, there was a tendency for one single firm to become dominant, and that the company had picked Facebook as the leader in English-language social networking. "On the Internet there is a tendency for 'winner takes all' and a leader emerges in every niche with surprising consistency," he said. "This is the main issue that we look at. When we made our first investment in Facebook, it was not obvious that it was a winner." Milner said he planned to invest the proceeds of the IPO in Internet projects, which he called "one of the most promising areas for the next 10 years". The Mail.ru Group and DST are part owned by Alisher Usmanov, a Russian billionaire of Uzbek origin who first invested in DST in 2008 and is also a major shareholder in Arsenal football club.


Internet: Learn About Twitter social network Tools

The Social Network - Defining Cultural Literacy and Technological Literacy

Define
Cultural Literacy and Technological Literacy

140 Character Conf

Social network sites are the Internet generation's equivalent of the town hall, the school cafeteria, or the workplace water cooler - the place where people come together to exchange both ideas and idle gossip.
There is no
absolute definition of literacy

Educational theorist E.D. Hirsch, Jr. said literate people in every society and every culture share a body of knowledge that enables them to communicate with each other and make sense of the world around them. The kinds of things a literate person knows will vary from society to society and from era to era; so there is no absolute definition of literacy. In the early twenty-first century, however, cultural literacy must have a large technological component.
Technological literacy is a much richer concept than computer literacy. Technological literacy can be thought of a comprising three interrelated dimensions that help describe the characteristics of a technologically literate person who has knowledge of technology and is capable of using it effectively to accomplish various tasks. He or she can think critically about technological issues and acts accordingly.


What every administrator, Policy Maker and Parent should know:

NSBA Social Network Report.pdf
MIT professor and clinical psychologist Sherry Turkle thinks "the impact of social networking on individual users and society in further accentuating "the tethered self" a person who understands himself and his feelings more in relation to others." It seems to be part of a larger trend in media culture for people not to know what they think until they get a sense of what everyone else think." "Tethered adolescents are given a cellphone by their parents. In return, they are expected to answer their parents' calls. On the one hand, this arrangement gives the adolescent new freedoms. On the other, the adolescent doe not have the experience of being alone, of having only him or herself to count on: there is always a parent on speed dial. This provides comfort in a dangerous world, yet there is a price to pay in the development of autonomy. There used to be a moment in the life of an urban child, usually between the ages of 12 and 14, when there was a first time to navigate the city alone. It was a rite of passage that communicated, 'You are on your own and responsible.' Tethering via a cellphone buffers this moment; tethered children think differently about themselves. They are not quite alone." And time alone to digest, reflect, and form our own views - not just in relation to how our friends or fellow IM-ers or social networkers think is a good thing.

Parents, teachers, and administrators who are concerned about what their kids are doing out of the house should also know what their kids are doing online. The 21st century is an online world and everyone needs 21st century skills.

Students think they are anonymous - wrong.   They don't realize how they can be traced online.  The Secret Service can identify the IP of your school from the message and if your kid even goes to that school. Then will go to the school and using the time stamp on the message and firewall logs, can identify the exact computer from which it came and the student who was logged in at the time.

K-12 Teacher Trainers - Twitter 24/7 Professional Development
Institutional Brand - digital footprint - Authentic Rich Learning Environments - It's about Networking. We now have education policy makers making policies about technology with a limited understanding of how it fits in education as a tool for learning, or even how it works, and viewing it as more of a hindrance than a help. It would be so much easier if Technology went away and we could get back to the “Three R's”, good ole' read'n, rite'n, and rithmetic.

It turns out that one child's educational tool is another child's distraction -- particularly when bored. Those distractions have led to a mini-war on laptops in the classroom. At the University of Colorado at Boulder, professor Diane Sieber also knew her students weren't all paying attention in class. She carried out a very unscientific study simply by comparing the grades of students who used laptops in class with those of the students who didn't. According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, Sieber privately informed the students after their first exam that they scored 11 percent lower than their counterparts without laptops. * But they don't take pencils or pens away when children are bored and they doodle with pencils.

 

Cyberbully TOOLS


LAW

Mark Zuckerberg, David Kirkpatrick, and Guy Raz: The Facebook Effect - Propaganda for people who don't realize how to evaluate business.

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WEB 2.0 TOOLS

 

 

LIST OF 5 DOZEN SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES

Financial Literacy - NetworthIQ, allows people to record their net worths and display the ups and downs for anyone to view. Most people who share their data do so anonymously, but Kincer posts a link to his personal Web site, where he uses his real name. Kincer especially liked that the site allowed him to compare himself with others. It appealed to the Mega Man player in him. “NetworthIQ is kind of a game,” he said. “Can I get ahead of everyone? Can I be up there with the big shots?” Net worth is the number you get when you subtract what you owe from what you own. You start with things like cash on hand, retirement savings and home equity and subtract your mortgage, as well as credit-card, student-loan and other debts. Net worth paints a bigger picture than income; it rewards the saver and reveals the drain that big borrowers put on their finances. And it vividly reminds people who think only in terms of monthly payments that their debts may be with them for a good long while.

We need to teach entrepreneurial skills not business manager skills. We need e-school -- not b-school. Skills in demand when it comes to the job. Need Money to Start - How to and Where to get the first investors

U.S. Students Need 21st Century Skills to Compete in a Global Economy Oct. 10, 2007
A new, nationwide poll of registered voters reveals that Americans are deeply concerned that the United States is not preparing young people with the skills they need to compete in the global economy. An overwhelming 80 percent of voters say that the kind of skills students need to learn to be prepared for the jobs of the 21st century is different from what they needed 20 years ago. Yet a majority of Americans say that schools need to do a better job of keeping up with changing educational needs. The national poll was conducted by Public Opinion Strategies and Peter D. Hart Research Associates on behalf of the Partnership for 21stCentury Skills.

 

Social Media's Power

 

 

From 21 Century skills learned and practiced from K-16
these are the skills in demand when it comes to the job.

Definition of 21st Century Literacy:
3 videos on managing info overload: Infotention http://bit.ly/5k9wMS - http://bit.ly/89uI0R - http://bit.ly/bw8yyI

The term "social media" first began to coalesce around 2003 to describe the impact of personal media and opinion through the emergence of low-cost publishing platforms. It was a term we adopted. We are rapidly moving to a post-social media world, where all media is social, and brands and businesses recognize its power to influence the entire enterprise.

Social media's power is profound and can strongly impact a wide range of use cases within brands, including risk management, media, product life cycle management, customer care, HR, market research, and innovation. There is a clear disconnect between the common association of the term "social media" with what it can actually do. Social Media is adopted as core to corporate strategy and not just another marketing channel. Social media is driving greater collaboration and forcing organizations to reexamine their business processes so they can be agile enough to react to the real-time social intelligence being infused into the organization.
The primary value of social media doesn't come from the tactics or the technologies, many of which are transitory, but from infusing its value across the enterprise to drive real and sustainable business advantage. And the examples of its power are tangible. HP, for example, said that it saved $10 million in call center costs by infusing social listening into customer service. Procter & Gamble reported that nearly half of its innovation is coming from outside the company through forms of social engagement, like its InnoCentive initiative. IBM is infusing ongoing real-time social intelligence across the organization for myriad use cases. This is about business redesign. It is also about the application of the social sciences. In our view, social media is about the evolution of human communication.
Cultural anthropology, sociology, psychology, and linguistics matter in marketing again. Concepts like "social framing," whereby individuals often perceive issues through the prism of their friends, are starting to help us rethink the way we communicate and the ways people gather, act, and synthesize information. Rethinking social organization through social media is beginning to have a transformative impact on governments and businesses.

Online Credibility Assessment
Information-seeking process figures into the final evaluation of content people encounter. Using unique data about how a diverse group of young adults looks for and evaluates Web content, our paper makes contributions to existing literature by highlighting factors beyond site features in how users assess credibility. We find that the process by which users arrive at a site is an important component of how they judge the final destination. In particular, search context, branding and routines, and a reliance on those in one's networks play important roles in online information-seeking and evaluation. We also discuss that users differ considerably in their skills when it comes to judging online content credibility. Full Text: PDF
Keywords: Credibility, Internet, Users, Web, Branding, Trust, Search, Information-Seeking, Media Literacy
Known brands were essential signifiers of quality for respondents, and seem to serve as an important part of users' daily information-gathering routines. However, not all name brands were trusted equally. Web sites from educational organizations and government entities were often trusted more than the average commercial site. We find evidence of users' trust in search engines with respect to the credibility of information they find when using these services. To complete many of the assigned tasks, students often turned to a particular search engine as their first step. When using a search engine, many students clicked on the first search result. Over a quarter of respondents mentioned that they chose a Web site because the search engine had returned that site as the first result suggesting considerable trust in these services. In some cases, the respondent regarded the search engine as the relevant entity for which to evaluate trustworthiness, rather than the Web site that contained the information. Students often did not investigate those results with regard to who authored the information they found through searching and ended up using to complete the tasks at hand. Going to a specific search engine like Google or Yahoo! was regularly the first step in the information-seeking process and students made this clear in the way they referred to the action of using such a service.

Social media releases are a Web 2.0 take on the traditional news release. They feature links, video and photos and are perfect for use on Facebook or other social media sites. Use PitchEngine, Marketwire and PRWeb they also have social media release builders for targeting online audiences.
Calling all bloggers can organizing a video meeting and inviting bloggers in addition to traditional media. Instead of pitching traditional media, you might also consider straight pitching to bloggers with whom you have or are trying to cultivate a relationship. Granting exclusivity on breaking news to bloggers whose sites receive lots of hits is a great way to cement relationships and make sure your news is seen by the masses.
Tweet It. If your company or client has a strong Twitter network. Bypass the media altogether and craft a 140-character news brief. If you have reporters who follow you on Twitter, I would also suggest tweeting the news @ them. If it's specific to their beat you just made their life that much easier, if it's not, you run the risk of annoying them a creating a reputation for yourself as a spammer, so beware.
Do It Yourself on YouTube. Don't wait for members of the media to contact you for a statement from your company on a recent announcement. Instead, consider shooting video of your CEO or a company spokesperson and upload it on YouTube. Then, promote the link on your website, social media pages and share a link with members of the media.
PODCASTING A podcast is a radio show that listeners subscribe to online.  Podcasts are a unique combination of subscription and publication.

VIDEOBLOG / VLOGS Video blogging Broadcasting Software

RSS THERE IS NOTHING SIMPLE ABOUT RSS IT IS DIFFICULT. RSS: podcasts are syndicated, meaning listeners just have to find them once, and receive them every time a broadcast is issued.

SMART MOBS A new form of social coordination made possible by the usage of modern technology, in particular the Internet and wireless devices.

WIKI "the simplest online database that could possibly work."

#social networks
#facebook privacy
#twitter
#flicker

 

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