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NEED TO KNOW COPYRIGHT RESOURCES

COPYRIGHT RESOURCES

  • How to find out if it is in the Public Domain.
  • What does a K12 Teacher or Administrator Need To Know?
  • Comic Book on CopyRight Law from Duke University Law School's Center for the Study of the Public Domain
  • CopyRight Resources
  • Search CopyRight
  • Copyright Registrations Procedures
  • Downloadable copyright forms
  • Copyright Protection Not Available for Names, Titles, or Short Phrases
  • Registering a federal trademark
  • FAQ: HOW TO MAKE THINGS SECURE
  • Fair Use Guidelines Applies to the Classroom but not beyond.
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Overview of US Copyright Law

K-12 COPYRIGHT LAWS: PRIMER FOR TEACHERS
Teachers and Administrators Need To Know what is legal to do in the Classroom.

Must see 1890's The Original Philadelphia Film Pirates which includes Thomas Edison.

COPYRIGHT ART LAW
VARA - The Visual Artists Rights Act LAW The Statute 17 USC section 106A Law protectin certain rights of the artist's works.

PROTECT ONLINE ART

Photographer Requests Takedowns - from Google and Yahoo Sample Letters

  • COMIC BOOK ON COPYRIGHT LAW
    Duke University Law School's Center for the Study of the Public Domain has published a comic book to teach users copyright law basics, including the distinctions between fair use and copyright infringement. The book's format and content are especially relevant to college students who are using and creating multimedia works. TALES FROM THE PUBLIC DOMAIN: BOUND BY LAW? can be downloaded for free.
  • PLAGIARISM CATCHING DIGITAL CHEATERS
  • Protecting Your Images and Bandwidth
    Image and bandwidth theft is running rampant on the web, but there's a simple method to prevent both. Learn how to protect yourself using CGI and JavaScript.
  • Saving the Graphics You See on a ClipArt WebPage
    PC - Place your Cursor over the Graphic. Click on it using the right side of your mouse. Then click on the left side of your mouse "Save Picture As" Save in selected folder and file name. Mac-click and hold to see options for saving
  • COPYRIGHT WIZARD

COPYRIGHT REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

  • Copyright Registrations Procedures
  • LOC downloadable copyright forms and complete instructions for filing for your copyright, fegistration fee is only $30
  • Online Copyright Forms
    Request Copyright Office circulars and application forms, write to:
    Library of Congress
    Copyright Office
    Publications Section, LM-455
    101 Independence Avenue, S.E.
    Washington, D.C. 20559-6000
    Or, if you know which forms and circulars you want, request them 24 hours a day from the Forms and Publications Hotline at (202) 707-9100. Leave a recorded message.
  • Copyright Protection Not Available for Names, Titles, or Short Phrases
  • For questions on trademarks or for information on registering a federal trademark www.uspto.gov
    Write to: Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks
    Washington, D.C. 20231
    Or call the Patent and Trademark help line at
    (800) PTO9199 or (703) 308-HELP (TTY: (703) 305-7785).
    Trademark Assistance Center, call (703) 308-9000
  • SEARCH LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT
  • GUIDELINES FOR MUSIC COPYRIGHT Guidelines have been developed and approved by the Music Publishers' Association of the United States, Inc., the National Music Publishers' Association, Inc., the Music Teachers National Association, the Music Educators National Conference, the National Association of Schools of Music, and the Ad Hoc Committee on Copyright Law Revision.

 

Indemnification Clauses
Many indemnification clauses are triggered by warranty clauses - promises you make to the publisher. It is cleaner to keep a contractual distance from anything that you can't control.
Suggest you make warranties only "to the writer's knowledge." Warranty clauses typically cover a range of conditions - copyright infringement, infringing any third party's rights (including those publicity and privacy), or writing something that would be libelous. Sometimes, editors will add things without telling the author. What happens when an editor makes up a quote out of nothing? If that quote puts the source in a bad light, you could be talking about a law suit. Or what if someone at the publication adds some "information" that is somehow judged to be an infringement of a company's intellectual property? It's hard to imagine a court would agree to an indemnification predicated on something that writer hadn't written.

ABOUT SELF PUBLISHING

  • The Copyright Office Electronic Registration has accepted CDs and DVDs of articles (and photos, for that matter) for copyright registration.
  • Will you make any money?
  • Extensive compilation of what all writers/publishers need to know
  • WEB SITES AND ARTICLES for small publishers, self-publishers and writers.
  • DIGITAL-COPYRIGHT discussion group
  • How to get your copyright registered ISBN ISBN/SAN Application
    ISSN (International Standard Serial Number)
    Preassigned Control Number Application
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